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CSDB Monthly History Lesson

1874-1884

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Hands-On Lessons

September focused on the years 1874-1884, the founding years of CSDB

Teachers chose stories to emphasize, creating hands-on experiences for the students

In the School for the Blind, the students experienced printmaking by creating their own impressions by inking letters such as with lithography

In the School for the Deaf, the students practiced woodworking and role-modeled the manners of the 1880's

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School for the Blind

150th_blind_printing_press_activity_-_1st_lesson

Major H. McAllister, friend of General Palmer, donated a printing press to the school.  This printing press became an important part of our history. On January 30, 1875 the first copy of the “Deaf-Mute Index” was printed.  The name of the publication was later changed to the “Colorado Index.” 

School for the Deaf

150th_deaf_role_play_manners_-_sept

Manners of the time: “In walking or driving, always turn to the right when you meet a person.  It is polite to recognize friends and acquaintances on the street.  It is the custom for gentlemen to take off their hats when they meet ladies. When a lady accidentally drops anything in the street, any gentleman near, whether he knows her or not, should pick it up and hand it to her.  The lady should not fail to thank him.” Colorado Index 

1884-1900

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School for the Blind

A student wearing a red sweatshirt builds a tower out of clay

 

The School for the Blind secondary classes had discussions about the trades CSDB taught and the addition of many buildings between 1884-1900. Each student then created a building from clay and toothpicks, seeing whose building was taller, or enjoyed an activity with brooms which connected to our broom making trade from long ago. The elementary students used shaving cream as an example of a fire retardant used to smother a large fire, after hearing about the Antler’s Fire in the late 1800’s.

 

 

School for the Deaf

Two teachers and two students practice pouring tea from a tea pot.

The School for the Deaf Elementary program showed what teatime would have been like in the 1890s and the kids experienced a tea manners demonstration. Then, the teacher explained about the beginning of electricity at CSDB, the trades taught and practiced, and the invention of the football huddle by Paul Hubbard, CSDB School for the Deaf alumnus.

1901-1920

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School for the Blind

 

The School for the Blind secondary and elementary students watched the 1901-1920 video, then talked about WWI, the flu, the need for students to stay on campus for the holiday, and the school’s dairy and chickens. Many students said they would have liked to drink coffee instead of milk. The activities included decoding a message in New York Point for the secondary students and the elementary, making a chicken that "clucked" using plastic cups, string, and sponge, while listening to music from the period as they worked on their craft.

School for the Deaf

 

The School for the Deaf elementary students looked at old photos of the CSDB buildings and the 1911 clock that still stands in the Administration Building.  They learned about burros that were used to haul away rubbish, and ponies that were given to the school for the students to ride. They also enjoyed the stories of the chickens who laid eggs on campus. Later, the students design toy color wheels made from paper plates that can whirl until the colors blend into white. 

1921-1940

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School for the Blind

The School for the Blind older students experienced barbering and hairstyling using colorful wigs and barber tools. The younger students discussed the measuring and weighing needed during baking, and lifted a variety of jars containing different items as a hands-on method of discussing weights. 

School for the Deaf

After learning how the students, from back then, cooked for themselves, the School for the Deaf K-5th grade students shook jars with heavy cream for a long time until they made butter. After spreading the button onto the bread, they ate! 

1941-1960

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School for the Blind

Picture collage of three pictures.  Students holding flags and a student sitting by a drum  holding drum sticks.

In the School for the Blind, some students participated in flag twirling. They learned flag positions based on the hands of a clock and how to spin the flag. They practiced a routine to an Elvis song. Other students tapped out drum beats to go along with the routine. This activity related to the 1958 story about the School for the Blind baton twirling team.

School for the Deaf

A picture collage of three pictures.  Students and teachers standing in front of a screen holding pompoms.

In the School for the Deaf, students discussed the history of CSDB, 1941-1960, including the School Building fire, cheerleading, heaps of snow, and more.  Students learned an ASL chant, used pom-poms, and practiced a routine. 

1961-1980

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School for the Blind

Collage of four photos; top left, two teachers near a monitor playing the video; top right, close up of students discovering the handbells; lower left, many students with handbells play while being directed by their music teacher; lower right, two students dig through a plastic basin filled with powder and buried treasures
Last week, the monthly history lesson, in the School for the Blind, centered around 1961-1980. The classes watched the video (posted for you to see, last Friday) and experienced hands-on lessons. Older students recreated the handbell choir. The younger students searched for treasures in a basin full of powder, identifying items through touch.
[Image: Collage of four photos; top left, two teachers near a monitor playing the video; top right, close up of students discovering the handbells; lower left, many students with handbells play while being directed by their music teacher; lower right, two students dig through a plastic basin filled with powder and buried treasures.]